plastiques

plastiques


“…a way to discover what images are hidden in the body, either to use them or exorcise them and free up the articulation of the line the body is making. “

SM    We both studied with Linda Putnam.  Do you find your dance teaching steeped in the ideas she teaches?

 JM   Because my understanding of Linda’s work is intertwined with life,  it is difficult to unravel what is specifically used in teaching.  I see it as the responsibility the artist has to the form, and that we continually need to be reminded of why we are making work – for whom do we make it, what is our role?
SM   The plastiques I studied with Linda were neutral movements of the joints, systematic lines and circles, taught non-verbally in a circle.  I learned to use them to study ways of doing things, moving and emotional that weren’t part of my usual expression.   Say I habitually used 3 physical forms for anger, but there were 10 altogether.  I might be able to  inhabit/study other ways than those, using the plastiques as an entry point.   Does this idea of the use of plastiques jive with yours?  How does it feature in your teaching practice?
JM  I use the plastiques as a way to discover what images are hidden in the body either to use them or the corporeal they would shape the body into or to exorcise them, in order to free up the  articulation  of the line in the body.
SM  When I examine my understanding of words I learned in Linda’s room, I recall physically.  Plastiques:  struggle, detail, joints;  Corporels:  when I “became connected” .  When the body began to inhabit.
JM  I think of plastiques as joint work and I work with it in all three dimensions.
SM   And how do you think of  a corporel?
JM   There is an experience familiar to me from Judith Koltai’s work in Authentic Movement  when the body is “taken”  and suddenly the entire  population of the body is attentive and aligned with each other. I understand this as a corporel.
SM  Can you describe an example?
JM   I recently saw a performance of elementary school children in Montreal. They worked distally  using their appendicular skeleton until suddenly there was a move where their whole bodies were there. It was corporel.  They all stood solidly on one leg with leg in front attitude and arms in second, rounded –it looked as though it was  initiated, depending of course  on the child, from their  navel and then engaged their arms  or from their arms and they went into their navel.