on the influence of tv dance competition

on the influence of tv dance competition

As audience development, it has brought many people to notice that dance exists. This isn’t bad as this audience might possibly start to investigate other moving forms. How long did it take before Baryshnikov discovered the post-modern dance of Yvonne Rainier and the research of Steve Paxton?  Thirty years?

 

Susan:    The “feedback” of the panels in these competitive TV shows like “So You Think You Can Dance” denigrates the performers, with no actual discussion of the choreography or language for movement involved.

Jennifer:
In terms of discourse, there is none at all. It perpetuates the demeaning judgement from a so called expert outsider that the second half of the 20th century fought to eradicate.

Susan
I try to talk about feedback with kids, reframe what the judges say, for instance, point out what amounts to bullying. Where is the positive?

Jennifer
As training, it works on motivation.

Susan
That’s a good doorway into looking at motivation with students, and parents.
I recently talked with some dance artists mentoring pre-professsionals. Consensus was that you often need to address training within the frame of the ambition (of both parents and dancers) to be in these competitions. One alway makes a point of advising parents and dancers “whatever you do, don`t go work on the cruise ships”, saying that injury and burnout were often the fallout of that path. I don’t know if that’s true.

Another talked about making solos for promising student dancers to use in local dance studio competitions – will they go on to do the solo in the context of a TV show?   Cruise ships, primetime TV competitions — ‘way different aspirations than when we were pre-professional. The thinking of the parents and children, the general public, is reshaped. The bottom line is actually audience development, populist dance.

 

JUSTINE

It is hard for me to connect training with sytycd.  In my mind the show is simply hyper-sexualized pageantry with a focus on beauty not dance.   The participants seem encouraged to be generalists. jack of all trades, master of none…despite the fact that they may come in with a certain expertise. dancer as commodity, a way to sell the brand…this is troubling for me.

Jennifer

As audience development, it has brought many people to notice that dance exists.  This isn’t bad as this audience might possibly start to investigate other moving forms. How long did it take before Baryshnikov discovered the post-modern dance of Yvonne Rainier and the research of Steve Paxton? Thirty years?

JUSTINE
I can agree with jennifer that the show has brought more attention to dance, but much like the CDA ‘i love dance’ campaign, I question whether it is the right kind of attention.